Venue

Henry Art Gallery
Northeast Seattle, Seattle

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Below you will find information for exhibits at Henry Art Gallery. Click here for the most up to date exhibition information.

Hostile Terrain 94
September 2020 – October 2021

Hostile Terrain 94 (HT94) is a participatory art exhibition created by the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP) and directed by UCLA anthropologist Jason De León. Occurring in more than 130 cities around the globe, the installation intends to raise awareness about the realities of the U.S.-Mexico border, focusing on the deaths that have occurred almost daily since 1994 as a direct result of the Border Patrol policy known as “Prevention Through Deterrence” (PTD). HT94 is realized with the help of local volunteers, who record names (when known), age, sex, cause of death, condition of body, and location of recovery on toe tags for each person. These tags are then pinned on the map in the exact location where those remains were found. The physical act of writing out the names and information for the dead invites participants to reflect, witness, and stand in solidarity with those who have lost their lives and their surviving communities. This form of public memorialization and mourning also opens opportunities to engage with active conversations related to ongoing migrant rights issues. HT94 renders the human consequences of PTD policies, while also promoting both global and local discourse on migrant labor, detention, and other intersecting topics through collaborative programs with community partners. Read more here.

Elaine Cameron-Weir: STAR CLUB REDEMPTION BOOTH
April 03, 2021 — September 12, 2021

In her sculpture, Elaine Cameron-Weir (b. 1985, Red Deer, Canada) grapples with questions of individual and collective human survival, while also considering the potential for renewal and transformation in states of being and forms of knowledge. Her work is informed by belief systems that structure how people make sense and meaning of the world—from science and religion to the nation state. Often repurposing objects with previous scientific, medical, or military functions, Cameron-Weir creates exquisitely assembled forms that conjure speculative uses or ritual applications in times past and future. Read more here.

Gary Simmons: The Engine Room
April 03, 2021 — August 22, 2021

The work of Gary Simmons (b. 1964, New York, NY) explores racial, social, and cultural politics, interrogating the ways in which we attempt to reconstruct the past via personal and collective memory. Simmons’s practice has evolved over the past three decades to incorporate painting, sculpture, installation, and interactive architectural environments. Music and music history has figured prominently, all refracted through the lens of racial identity and representation. His work is occupied by the unfixed nature of a past that remains open to the vagaries of memory, and its role in the construction of the character of contemporary America—in particular through pop cultural imagery: sports, music, film, cartoons. Read more here.

2021 University of Washington MFA + MDes Thesis Exhibition
May 29, 2021 — June 27, 2021

Each year, the Henry presents the University of Washington's School of Art + Art History + Design Master of Fine Arts and Master of Design thesis exhibition. Throughout their programs, fine arts and design students work with advisers and other artists to develop advanced techniques, expand concepts, discuss critical issues, and emerge with a vision and direction for their own work. The 2021 presentation of this exhibition will include work by both 2020 and 2021 graduating students. Read more here.

Light Reign, James Turrell Skyspace
Permanent Exhibition

The James Turrell Skyspace, Light Reign, was unveiled to the public in July of 2003. Since then, it has been the site of numerous meditation sessions, a Quaker silent meeting, a performance art piece, an audio installation by artist Steve Roden, and thousands of individual visits. Combining architecture, sculpture, and atmosphere, the work is not only a spectacular addition to the museum's permanent collection, it has become an important part of the building's architecture. Read more here.

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